Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Book Lovers Blog Giveaway!

What's your favorite short book to read aloud and use in a mini-lesson? Answering that question could win you an autographed copy* of Power Reading Workshop: A Step-by-Step Guide!

The idea for a giveaway came to mind because I need some ideas for a list of short books that can be read aloud and used to teach a reading skill. I decided to ask for help and give away a copy of my book at the same time. If you win and you already have Power Reading Workshop, you may request Graphic Organizers for Reading or another book from my website.   

I should also share that one purpose for the giveaway is to let people know about my Corkboard Connections blog. I've been told by teachers that they follow me on Facebook or receive my newsletters, but they didn't even know I had a blog! I started Corkboard Connections last fall as a place to share some of my favorite strategies as well as to learn from others. So please share this blog post and help me spread the word!

How do you enter the contest?
Entering is easy! You only have to do two things:
  • Follow my Corkboard Connections blog by email, RSS feed, or by using the Google Friend Connect link. Personally, I like to follow my favorite blogs by email because the blog posts come right to my inbox. But some people prefer to use Google Feed Reader or other methods, so that's fine, too. 
  • Leave a comment below in which you share the title of a short read aloud (15 to 20 minutes max) along with the skill you teach with the book. Your comment could be as simple as saying that you use Jack and the Beanstalk to teach character motives. Or you could leave a more detailed comment with specific information about your lesson.
How will a winner be selected? 
The contest will end on Wednesday, February 22nd, at 8 p.m. EST. I'll use a random number generator to choose from all eligible entries, and then I'll post the name of the winner in a new blog message. It will not be announced on Facebook or in my newsletter - be sure you are following Corkboard Connections so that you'll receive that special blog post if you win!

I'm looking forward to reading about your favorite books for teaching reading strategies and skills. I know I'll discover some great children's books as a result of the sharing and collaborating here!





Laura Candler ~ Teaching Resources

*Note: The autographed copy offer is only good in the United States and Canada. If you live outside of those areas, you will be sent the digital version instead.

69 comments:

  1. I use "Math Curse" as a starting point for seeing maths in all areas of life.

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  2. I love using Picture Books as models of good writing strategies. One of my favorites is MASTER OF ALL MASTERS. I read it aloud after we read FRINDLE, and students create a story using made up words. It's always a hit and super funny!

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  3. Thanks! I'll look at Math Curse again, and I have not heard of Master of all Masters. I'll have to check it out!

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  4. I like to use The Teacher who Could Not Count around the first day of school to talk about how important it is to know and learn math.
    meredith.mitchell@nhcs.net

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  5. Riding The Tiger, by Eve Bunting, is a good one to use for inferring. It's definitely one for the older elementary students, though (grades 6 - 8). The Sweetest Fig, or The Wretched Stone, both by Chris Van Allsburg, are good ones for inferring with grades 3 - 5.

    Jen
    Runde's Room

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  6. One of my favorites is Water Dance by Locker. I use it to look at text structure in reading workshop, but it works beautifully for personification and voice in writing workshop as well. There are several of them (Cloud Dance, Mountain Dance). The illustrations are perfect backdrops for the text.

    Ms. Fultz =)

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  7. Thanks for these suggestions! I will take a look tomorrow!

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  8. I LOVE using "The Important Book" by Margret Wise Brown to teach main idea and detail. It is so simple, yet lends itself to great extensions.

    ~Stephanie
    Teaching in Room 6

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  9. I like to use "The Stranger" for questioning. I'm going to take my name out of the running for the giveaway because I already own a copy. I tell everyone this book changed my teaching life, and it really did. The winner is going to be one lucky teacher.

    Selina

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  10. I like to use The Red Wolf by Margaret Shannon for predicting. I split it up into a few days and the anticipation builds up to foster amazing predictions. I also use The Stranger for question, just like Selina.

    Dani
    Its-grow-time.blogspot.com

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  11. I use Chocolate Moose for Dinner to teach homophones and other figures of speech. We also just talked about the Arms Race in social studies so my students were able to make a connection.

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  12. My first graders love the book "Yo! Yes?" It's a great way to introduce them to the meaning and importance of punctuation when reading.

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  13. Quick as a Cricket is perfect for similes. Amelia Bedelia is also a great one for "figures of speech"/homophones.

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  14. I love Dear Mrs. La Rue: Letters From Obedience School for teaching voice! (and letter writing)

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  15. I love "The Mysteries of Harris Burrdick." I use it for questioning. It's great after the concrete experience of asking questions and moving into books. I give them 5 post-its and have them write one before, up to three during, and one after reading questions. It also lets them see that not all their questions will be answered when they read.

    Laura

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  16. This week I used "Duck on a Bike" by David Shannon to teach predicting. My 3rd graders LOVED it!

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  17. I recently shared One Green Apple by Eve Bunting to teach the power of a distinct voice in writing.

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  18. The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by John Scieska to teach perspective, point of view, and bias.

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  19. Thanks for all the comments and book suggestions so far! I'm very excited to see these new titles! Amazon.com, here I come!

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  20. The Important book, to teach about writing a small moment/personal narrative. Also Each Orange Had 8 Slices to teach about multiplication (sets of).

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  21. I love using Jan Brett's The Mitten and The Hat for comparing and contrasting.

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  22. I love using "The Sweetest Fig" by Chris VanAllsburg because it's a great example of irony, perspective, treating each other with respect, and so on.

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  23. I love to use "A Bad Case of Strips" by David Shannon for cause and effect.

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    1. I meant "A Bad Case of Stripes"...sorry!

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  24. To teach inferencing, I've used "Piggie Pie" by Margie Palatini and this year I also used "Tuesday" by David Weisner. The kids really enjoy both books.

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  25. I used "Owl Moon" by Jane Yolen to teach about the setting and then had the students make a diaroma. They were so creative and I was suprised how much they loved the story. We then researched Owls and they all wanted to make owls during art center.

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  26. I love "The Important Book" by Margaret Wise Brown as a mentor text to teach main idea through writing. I also love using "Pete the Cat" by Eric Litwin as an interactive read aloud with young children.

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  27. One of my favorite books is "The Napping House" by Audrey wood. The pictures are so colorful and my students love seeing this book. I use it to show them how to use sequencing in a story. I also love using "If you give a Mouse a Cookie" to demonstrate how cause and effect realtionships are formed. This year I had them create their own original story modeled after the book using a powerpoint presentation to share their stories and some students just went wild with it!

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  28. My favorite book is Frindle. We use it to learn to use a dictionary and making up words.

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  29. I use The Other Side by Woodson as a read a loud for Black History. It provides me with a significant reading about getting along with others and focusing on what is significant in friendship.

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  30. I use Chrysanthemum so teach the students that their name is special and so are they. We talk about why each child is special and also focus on how to treat others/ be a friend.

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  31. I like using Miss Nelson is missing for inferring.
    Caroline
    Brantcc@bay.k12.fl.us

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  32. I love The Quiltmaker's Journey and The Quiltmaker's Gift to teacher character traits and cause and effect. I also use Owl Moon by Jane Yolen when I teach writing and using descriptive words. It's filled with a variety of interesting, unusual words.

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  33. In our school, we have been teaching thinking strategies. This week we are starting "determining importance" or main idea. I am planning on using Bread and Jam for Frances for my kindergarten class.

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  34. I use Voices in the Park for Voice and Perspective.

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  35. I use Sir Cumference and the Knights of Angleland to teach the different angles. Math is definitely my stronger subject, which is why I am so interested in your Power Reading Workshop... :)

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  36. I use Bat Loves Night, do show the effectivness of sentence Fluncey through variety of sentences.

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  37. I follow via GFC and I love to use Chicka, Chicka Boom Boom with my kindergarteners at the beginning of the year to expose them to the alphabet and most of them already know the story so they can read along too!

    kellybrown28021@gmail.com

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  38. I like to use "I Wanna Iguana" by Karen Kaufman Orloff to show persuasive writing.

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  39. I love The Taste of Colored Water for inferring..perfect for Black History Month. Love to use Lily's Purple Plastic Purse for connections. The Aminal Laura Balin is great for visualization...out of print book but if you can get your hands on a copy I recommend. My kids LOVE that book- biological and students that is:)

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  40. I use The Napping House to show sequence. I recently read this book to a group of single mothers that I help to mentor. I modeled how to read to a young child through questioning, inflection, inference, etc.

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  41. I use A Bad Case of Stripes to teach the children that they are special and they should love themselves for who they are.

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  42. I love to use Furious George Goes Bananas to explore parody with my 9th grade students. They love it!

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  43. I use the book "Owl Moon" to teach how to put sensory details in their writing.

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  44. Voices in the Park by Anthony Browne... to teach perspective and voice. Such a great book!

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  45. I follow you via email and on the site GFC

    Nettie Joe's Friends by Patricia C. McKissack: Dialect, Prediction/outcome, Dialogue

    "Brer Possum's Dilemma" retold by Jackie Torrence: Voice, Tone, Dialect, Characterization, motifs, morals

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  46. I am a big fan of all things Jan Brett. Her illustrations, especially her borders, are great tools for reading strategies such as prediction and inferring! The Hat, The Mitten, and On Noah's Ark are just 3 of my many favorites!

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  47. One of my favorite books to read aloud is Dear Polar Bear by Barry Ablett.

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  48. I use "If You Give a Mouse a Cookie" (or one of Laura Numeroff's other books in this series) to teach cause and effect to my 3rd graders.

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  49. I love reading and using "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" by Jon Scieszka to teach about perspective.

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  50. Martin's Big Words to teach questioning of text and making connections among different textexts.

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  51. I love Two Bad Ants by Chris VanAllsburg. I use it to teach inferencing, but it can be used for much more..sequencing, character study, etc...

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  52. Thank you Mr Falker by Patricia Pollaco for teaching theme

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  53. I like to use Enemy Pie to teach questioning and predicting.

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  54. Hooray for Wodney Wat is a GREAT book for students who have trouble pronouncing their /r/ sounds.

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  55. Love all the ideas that I have read so far! (That is a prize in itself!). I have so many favorites, but one that I adore is "Miss Fiona's Stupendous Pumpkin Pies." It's great for setting, inferencing, and word choice. Another favorite is "The VanGogh Cafe" by Cynthia Rylant. It's amazing for so many things, I love it for visualization. In the past I have also used it to kick off creative writing stories in my classroom.

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  56. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  57. Oops! I just picked a winner because I thought the contest ended today! But my post says it ends on Wednesday, so it's still open! I'll just have to pick another winner tomorrow!

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  58. I use Donald Crews' "Shortcut" and teach Onomatopoeias. I teach kindergarten and the large font as well as the story line and the pictures really get my kids excited to try their own sound words out. Plus it introduces the students to the idea that somethings the words aren't in a straight line on the bottom of the page but sometimes we have to look at the whole page!

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  59. Rosie's Walk is great for prepositions

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  60. I teach middle school and they love read alouds! I like using "Lunch Money, and other poems about School" to teach figurative language.

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  61. Skippy Jon Jones is my favorite with my class

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  62. I read "The Empty Pot" by Demi to emphasize the importance of honesty and integrity. I also read "Enemy Pie" by Derek Munson to talk about giving new kids a chance to become your friend. We have a transient population. We have kids coming and going all year long.

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  63. My favorite short book to use for read alouds is A Terrible Horrible Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst. You can use it to jump into so many different writing activities about your worst day, retelling the story from one of the other character's point of view, and stories about relationships between family members and friends.

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  64. I use My Daddy Snores to teach similes and figurative language to my Gr. 2's.

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  65. hello Dear Laura Candler, iam new here, for reading iam using reading comprehension to teach reading skill, thanks

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  66. Wilfrid Gordan McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox to teach text to self connections. Also great for inference

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  67. The Important book for main idea, and The Art Lesson by Tomie De Poala

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