Saturday, March 31, 2012

Now's the Time for Math Stations!

Have you  used math stations or math centers in your classroom this year? If not, this is the perfect time to start! As you prepare for end-of-the-year tests, you need time to work with small groups of students on specific skills. But what are you supposed to do with the other kids? If you set up math stations, the rest of the class can work with a partner or alone on a math review game or activity. This photo shows two of my former students playing a matching math review game. Math stations make the end of the year so much fun!

Over the last 10 years, I've experimented with several methods for using math stations. I discovered that setting them up wasn't nearly as difficult as I had imagined. Math centers can consist of nothing more than a deck of math cards and a set of directions. I generally used the Rotation Station model or Choice Stations with center menu options. You can learn more about both models on my Implementing Math Stations page on Teaching Resources. On that page, you'll also find some great free math games to use in centers.

Math Stations for Middle Grades (3 - 8)
After years of using math stations successfully, I decided to write an ebook to share my strategies. Math Stations for Middle Grades includes management strategies, prepared math games, and a variety of templates so that you can create your own problems to go along with the games. The item shown here is for a single classroom; I now have a school site license available as well. You can preview everything online before you purchase to see if the materials are right for your classroom.


More recently, I've created loads of freebies and games to use in math centers, and many of them are aligned with the Common Core. Just take a look in my Math File Cabinet to see what you can find!





Thursday, March 29, 2012

Facebook Freebie Giveaway

If you could win any one of my teaching resources, which one would you choose? If you answer that question on Facebook, you could win it!

From time to time, I post a question on Facebook, and one lucky teacher becomes the winner of up to $20 worth of teaching resources! This week I'm adding a little twist, so I decided to blog about the contest to explain how to enter.

For this contest, I'm asking you to take a look at all of the items in my TeachersPayTeachers store and tell me which item you would like to win (up to $20 in value) and why you like it. While you are browsing my TeachersPayTeachers store, please click the Follow Me link at the top to be notified when I add new freebies and resources. Also, my TpT followers have the chance to download new products for about half price when I first add them to the site.

How to Enter
Since this is a Facebook giveaway, you'll need to enter by going to my Facebook page and letting me know which of Laura Candler's TeachersPayTeachers items you would like to win and why. Click this link to go directly to the Facebook Freebie Giveaway status update where you can post your response. The contest ends Friday evening, March 30th, around 8 p.m. EST. At that time, I'll review the responses carefully and use Random.org to help me select a winner.

How to find out if you win 
I'll announce the winner in my Candler's Classroom Connections newsletter on Saturday, so be sure you are subscribed. You can learn more about my newsletter and subscribe by visiting my newsletter sign up page. Each week I send out free teaching tips and printables, links to helpful websites, and special deals on my ebooks and lessons. Even if you don't win this week's contest, you'll be a winner each Saturday when you receive the newsletter! :-)

So which item in my TpT store would you like to win? Take a look around and visit my Facebook Wall  and enter your response where you see the yellow question mark. I'm looking forward to hearing which item is your favorite!



Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Race Against the Clock to Find Factors!

Do your students need more practice with finding the factors of a number? Being able to find factors quickly and accurately is an important math skill, but many practice activities are of the drill-and-kill type. Factor Race Math Game is a fun alternative to worksheets; students race against the clock to find all the factors of a number, and they score points for the number of correct factors they find! But watch out! If they list a single incorrect factor, they score 0 points for that round!

This free packet includes directions and task cards on two levels of difficulty. After you introduce it to your class, they can play it in a math station or in cooperative learning teams. You can download the game from my Math Centers page on Teaching Resources or from my TeachersPayTeachers store. If you try this game with your students, you'll be amazed at how quickly they become pros at finding factors!

Monday, March 26, 2012

Easter Egg Showdown Fun

Easter egg activities aren't just for little ones! You might not take older kids on an Easter egg hunt, but you can bring colorful plastic eggs into the classroom and jazz up any review activity using this Easter Egg Showdown freebie!

Showdown is a cooperative learning activity in which students work first alone, and then with a team, to solve problems or answer questions on task cards. Easter Egg Showdown is a variation in which the task cards are tucked inside plastic Easter eggs. Students select an egg, open it, read the problem or task, and everyone on the team writes a response. In the final step, team members compare and discuss their answers. In this example, the task cards contain sentences, and students have to identify the subject and the predicate of each sentence.

The entire Easter Egg Showdown freebie packet includes teacher directions, student directions, the Subject and Predicate activity shown, a division activity, and blank templates to create your own task cards. You can download it from my TeachersPayTeachers store or from the Seasonal page on Teaching Resources. One reason I love this activity is that you can easily adapt almost any Showdown activity to use with the Easter Eggs. To find more Showdown task cards, go to Teaching Resources at http://www.lauracandler.com and type "showdown" into the search box at the top. Showdown works well with basic math review problems, vocabulary words and definitions, states and capitals, or science and social studies questions. What an "eggsciting" way to review!



Sunday, March 25, 2012

Fantastic Foldable Freebies Link Up!

How can you transform almost any assignment into an adventure? Use foldables! Foldables are so much fun to make, and when students create their own, they seem to take more pride in their work. Lately I've noticed lots of great blog posts by teachers who love foldables as much as I do, so I created this Fantastic Foldable Freebies Link Up. You can learn more and find other great examples of foldables at the bottom of this blog post.


Note-taking Foldables
Foldables are terrific for note-taking assignments based on informational text. The examples shown on the right were created by my students during a science unit on the rain forest. I had four subtopics I wanted them to explore; therefore, I used a four-flap foldable so they could write one question on each flap. 

Below you'll find directions for making this rain forsest foldable. It works great for taking notes on any topic that has four clear subtopics - even textbook chapters! I usually have students create foldables from plain paper, but if you've never created this one before, you may want to use the pattern below. It has dotted lines for folding and solid lines for cutting. You can download the Rain Forest Foldable pattern from the Science File Cabinet on Teaching Resources.

How to Make a Rain Forest Foldable:
  1. Give each student a large sheet of white construction paper - 12" x 18" was used in the examples above. Show your students how to fold it into eighths. (If using the pattern, have them fold on the dotted lines.)
  2. Ask students to open their papers and then fold the top and bottom halves in to meet at the center. (If using the pattern, the printed side goes down.)
  3. Next, show your students how to snip the fold in the middle of each flap to create a total of four flaps as shown in the photo above. (If using the pattern, cut on the two solid lines.)
  4. Ask students to write the title of the foldable and their name in the large space on the back, and then flip it over and write their four subtopics on the front, one per flap.
  5. If time allows, provide a few minutes for students to decorate their foldables. 
  6. Demonstrate how to lift up each flap and take notes in the area under the flap. (Tip: It's helpful to draw solid lines on the folds inside the foldable to separate the four sections.)
Not only are foldables a terrific way to actively engage students, they're also great because kids can store them and refer to them later when studying for a test or completing an assignment. I can't wait to see all the super ideas that will be shared here. I've also connected this Link Up to the Ultimate Linky Party on Teaching Blog Addict so you can find even more terrific resources after you check out the foldables here!



Friday, March 23, 2012

Island Conquer Area & Perimeter Games

Area and perimeter are two concepts that students frequently confuse, so fun math games to practice those skills are always welcome - especially when they are free! Island Conquer is a set of two games that provide opportunities for students to explore area or perimeter on a coordinate grid. Students play with a partner and take turns using the Coordinate Cards to plot rectangles on the Island Conquer game board. After each person plots a rectangle, he or she calculates the area or perimeter of the "captured" island. At the end of the game, they add up the total area or perimeter to find out who is the new Island King or Queen!

If you download this freebie from my TeachersPayTeachers store, please rate it and leave a comment. It means so much to hear from teachers who use my teaching resources with their students. If you don't have a TpT account, you can also download it from the Geometry folder in my online Math File Cabinet at Teaching Resources. I hope your students enjoy this game as much as mine did!




Laura Candler ~ http://www.lauracandler.com

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Hands On Geometry - Part II

Guest Blog Post by Stephanie Moorman of Teaching in Room 6

Last week I shared Hands-on Geometry, Part I, and I'm back with Part II! The Hands-on Geometry Freebie shown on the right includes templates that go with both lessons.

Area and Perimeter
I love going outside for these standards.  Heading out with our rulers and paper in hand, the kids measure various signs and playground objects.  I usually have the students find both the area and the perimeter of the objects (depending upon what time of year I have them do this activity). This is really fun, since the kids often have to work together to measure the objects (since the lines on the playground are often larger than the 12 inches a ruler provides)  They are getting practice in converting inches to feet, measuring large objects, AND finding the perimeter and/or area of those objects.  So much math, all on the playground!

Surface Area
I like to have the students discover this concept for themselves.  I give them a tissue box, paper, and scissors, with instructions to cover the box with no overlap.  Then they have to tell me how much paper they need.  This takes some time, but they actually all do figure out that they need to create a net, measure each side, find the area of each side, and add it all together.

Volume
Back to the food again!  Using the marshmallows (they are cheap and easy because of their shape), the students need to create cubes and rectangular prisms of set sizes.  If I have them create a 36 marshmallow cube, they can see that the entire thing gets filled it.  It is 36 cubic units.  We then count the marshmallows on the length, the width, and the height.  Multiply them together, and you get 36 cubic units!

Circumference
The circumference of a circle is about 3 times the diameter.  To show the students this, I take them outside to one of the painted circles on the playground.  We all sit around it and I have the students walk the diameter of the circle.   When we all have a basic idea of what the diameter is, the kids then walk the actual circle.  To their amazement, it really does take them 3x as long to walk around the outside of the circle!

There really are so many different ways to help the students learn the different concepts found within the Geometry and Measurement strands.  With a little creativity, it is easy to make these vital standards come to life for the students!  How have you made these standards more hands-on?  Please comment below.  I would love to hear about it!

Stephanie Moorman is a 5th grade teacher who has been teaching elementary school for 14 years. She has her Masters in Education and is Nationally Board Certified. She is the creator of the Teaching in Room 6 blog where she enjoys sharing her strategies with others. 


Monday, March 12, 2012

Hands-on Geometry - Part I


Guest Blog post by Stephanie Moorman of Teaching in Room 6

Measurement and geometry standards span all grade levels. Because of this repeated exposure, you would think that the students would grasp the concepts easily.  However, that just isn’t so. Identifying various polygons and solid shapes, breaking them down into their basic lines and angles, discovering the perimeter and area of a shape is sometimes tricky for the students.  Especially when most of the time the work the students are doing is from a text book.

In an effort to help my students more clearly grasp the Measurement and Geometry standards, I have tried hard to break away from the book and use hands-on strategies to introduce and reinforce concepts.  Here are a few of the activities and lessons I have done in the past to teach my students measurement and geometry. Next week in Part II of this blog post, I'll share a few more.

Polygons
Identifying various two-dimensional shapes can be rather boring when simply looking in a book.  One thing I have done to get my students more actively involved in their learning is to break out my trusty stack of magazines.

The students divide their paper into 5 columns, one for each of the basic polygons we are learning.  If you are learning more (ie: equilateral triangle, scalene, isosceles  or the various different types of quadrilaterals) just divide your paper into the appropriate amount of columns.  At the top of the page, I have the students draw the regular polygon and we list the attributes.  Then, they are off.  The students search the magazine for pictures of the polygons, cut them out, and glue them under the proper column heading.

Solid Figures
Once the students enter into the realm of three-dimensional solid figures, using the book definitely doesn’t cut it.  So there are several things I do to get the kids thinking, and learning, about solid figures.

I always introduce the figures with pictures.  We look at plain, generic solids, and I ask the students to tell me objects they have seen that would match those shapes.  Kids always mention things like ice cream cones for the cone shape, soda can for a cylinder, dice for a cube, a pyramid for a square pyramid, and a book for a rectangular prism.  I then have them go home that night and search for actual objects that would fit into the categories.  They write down all the objects they can, and bring one of their choice in.  The next day, we all categorize the found objects.You can download this chart by clicking on the image; the chart is page 2 of the freebie which includes a worksheet for next week's activity, too.

Food is always a hit with the students.  Actually creating solid figures out of marshmallows and toothpicks is a wonderful way to get the kids thinking.  We discuss the vertices, edges, and faces for each solid figure, and the students set about building them.

Nets of Solids
Using the marshmallow figures described above, I have the students deconstruct them and create the nets.  This is VERY difficult for them, mostly because once you take some of the toothpicks out of the marshmallows, there are edges missing!  The students need to figure out that they have to add the toothpicks and marshmallows to create the whole.  It is interesting to see who gets this concept.

Another thing I have done with nets is to give the students a piece of paper and let them create the nets.  Kids must figure out that the circles on a cylinder must be the same diameter as the length of the rectangle.  They need to use all of the same size squares for a cube.  Everything needs to be very precise or it just won’t work!

Angles and Lines
I am big on kinesthetic learning. Because of this, I have a lot of motions and gestures instilled in my teaching of concepts to help the kids better understand.  When it comes to angles, we get moving a lot!  Using their arms, I have the students show me each type of angle and line as best they can.  The kids really get into it!  When I say “parallel lines”, their arms always move up over their heads in two straight lines.  When I say “ray”, their arm extends out and they point off in one direction.  An “obtuse angle” has two arms, one extended out straight from their body and the other at a large angle.  The kids LOVE moving around, and it really helps them remember all of the different angles and lines.

So there you have it!  These are some simple ways to get your kids actively involved in learning the Measurement and Geometry standards.  There are SO many more ways to have a hands-on experience with these standards, and I'll be share a few more with you next week. I'll also be including a Hands-on Geometry freebie for you to customize!  If you have ideas to share, please leave a comment and let us all know!

Stephanie Moorman is a 5th grade teacher who has been teaching elementary school for 14 years. She has her Masters in Education and is Nationally Board Certified. She is the creator of the Teaching in Room 6 blog where she enjoys sharing her strategies with others.

Sunday, March 11, 2012

Vote for DonorsChoose Projects!


DonorsChoose Friends and Family week starts tomorrow, and that means every donation placed with a special code will be matched, dollar for dollar. I have pledged to donate at least $500 during this week, and I'm currently reviewing the 86 projects that have been submitted on my DonorsChoose Link and Vote blog post from earlier this week. Please help me select projects by voting for your favorites!


Here's how to vote: 
  1. Visit the DonorsChoose Link and Vote blog post and scroll to the end where the projects have been submitted.
  2. You can vote for your three favorite projects.
  3. Total vote counts are only displayed after you vote for three projects.
  4. I don't think you can vote for your own submission, but I'm not sure. This is the first time I've done this, and I'm learning as I go.
After the voting closes on Monday at noon, the projects will be reorganized according to the number of votes cast for each. I'll donate to the top 2 or 3, but after that I'll review the remaining projects and vote according to their descriptions and where I see a special need. I tend to look for projects that need under $200 to finish them or those that already have a lot of donors, which I take as sign of community support.

If you are a public school teacher and have not been using DonorsChoose, please visit my DonorsChoose page and watch the free webinar to learn how to write your own proposal. Now, on to the projects ..... !



Thursday, March 8, 2012

Measurement Mania Freebies

Measurement skills are difficult to teach from a textbook. Not only do students have to learn measurement units and conversions, they have to apply what they've learned with hands-on activities. Even then, they need to play games and engage in tasks to reinforce what they've learned and commit those units to memory.

Luckily, there are loads of resources available to help you teach measurement, and many of them are free. At the bottom of this blog post you'll see a collection of measurement freebies from teacher-bloggers. Just click each link to hop to the blog post where you can read about the activity and download it for FREE!

You can also find loads more free measurement resources on the Measurement page of my online file cabinet at Teaching Resources.

Thanks to Wendy Candler of Digital Classroom Clipart for the colorful measurement clipart above!

The Measurement Mania Freebie Collection is brought to you by Laura Candler, Denise Boehm, Jenaya Shaw, Rachel Friedrich, Rachel Lynette, Stephanie Moorman, Mandy Neal, Selina Smith, and Dana Richliew. Enjoy the activities!




Wednesday, March 7, 2012

DonorsChoose Link and Vote!


If you follow my blog, you know that I'm a big supporter of DonorsChoose.org. This organization has helped public school teachers across America receive millions of dollars in funding for classroom projects. You can read my first blog post on DonorsChoose, written back in November, that explains why I love DonorsChoose and why I enjoy helping to fund projects. To learn more about this organization, you can watch a free webinar I did with Francie Kugelman called How to Fund Your Classroom Projects.

Every so often DonorsChoose has a Friends & Family week in which the Board of Directors matches all donations when a special code is entered. We won't know what the special code is until Monday, but I want to start reviewing projects now to get ready. You can submit one project any time from today, Wednesday, March 7th, through Saturday, March 10th, at midnight. Voting will start on Sunday and end on Monday at noon. Sometime that afternoon or evening, I'll choose at least 5 projects and donate $100 to each of them. Since my donation will be doubled, my $100 will become $200!

How to Submit Your Project - Wednesday - Saturday
To submit your project for me to consider, add it to the Link Up at the bottom of this page. You may submit only ONE DonorsChoose project to this Link Up. Here's what to do:
  1. Go to your project page on DonorsChoose and copy the URL. 
  2. Click the blue Add Your Link button at the bottom of this post to display the 3 submission fields.
  3. Paste the URL from your DonorsChoose project page into URL block.
  4. For the Name field, write your project title - do not write your own name.
  5. Enter your email address. This will not be displayed but I can use it to contact you if needed. 
  6. Click Next Step, and you'll see a page of thumbnail images. Select the thumbnail that best represents your DonorsChoose page. You can click the crop button first to choose the area of the photo to include. 

How to Vote - Sunday - Monday
Starting on Sunday, you can send your friends and family to this page to vote. Here's the scoop:
  1. You can vote for your three favorite projects.
  2. Total vote counts are only displayed after you vote for three projects.
  3. I don't think you can vote for your own submission, but I'm not sure. This is the first time I've done this, so it may take some experimentation to figure out the best way to do this.
  4. After the voting closes on Monday at noon, the projects will be reorganized according to the number of votes cast for each.
How Projects Will Be Selected
I'll review the projects posted here and start making donations with the matching code sometime in the afternoon on Monday. I've leaving town on Tuesday, so I would like to get my donations made before I go. I usually choose the top two or three projects by the number of votes, but after that I'll read the proposals carefully and decide on my own which ones to fund. So don't worry if your project doesn't have the most votes - if it stands out to me as a worthy project, I'm likely to select it. I try to choose a variety of projects from different subject areas. 

By the way, be sure to let your friends and family know about DonorsChoose Friends and Family Matching Week next week. Last time they held a Friends and Family week, over $600,000 worth of donations were made! I look forward to reading your project submissions ... let the games begin! 







Monday, March 5, 2012

Leprechaun Luck Probability Freebie

Looking for a fun way to teach probablility? You're in luck! The Leprechaun Luck Probability Game is a freebie that allows kids to experience the laws of probablity in an exciting game of chance. In order to win, your students will need a bit of luck, but they'll also discover that there's more than luck involved in winning.

You’ll need a box of Lucky Charms cereal for the class and one Leprechaun Luck gameboard for each student. You'll also need two dice for each game. Download the free instructions and the game boards from my TeachersPayTeachers.com store. Pair students with a partner of similar abilities, and display the directions on page 3 as you explain the rules. Here's a summary of how the game is played:

  1. Each player places 12 Lucky Charms cereal pieces in any location on his or her game board. All of the pieces can be placed on one number, one on each number, or any other combination. 
  2. Players take turns with their partner rolling the two dice and adding to find the sum. 
  3. The student who rolled the dice removes all the pieces from that spot on his or her board. 
  4. Players keep taking turns rolling dice and removing cereal until one person has removed all the cereal from his or her own board.
Let your students play a few rounds, discuss their strategies with their partners, and then switch to play against someone else. It's only after they play for awhile that the fun really begins! Students soon realize that some numbers are luckier than others! You can’t get a sum of 1, so placing cereal on that spot is a sure way to lose.  After awhile, they’ll start to realize that the numbers in the middle are luckier than those at the top and bottom of the board. Challenge them to figure out why this is true. Hint: If they list all the sums they can get from every combination of two rolls, they'll realize that some numbers have more possible combinations of addends. For example, there’s only one way to get a sum of 2, but you can get a sum of 7 by rolling 1 + 6, 2 + 5, and 3 + 4. Maybe that’s why 7 has always been considered to be a lucky number! Allow plenty of time for students to play the game and explore probability concepts.

I know your students will have fun with this game! Kim Arnold commented on this freebie on TpT, and she summed up the situation nicely. She wrote, "Dice AND Lucky Charms in the same game? The kids will think that's lucky enough!" I couldn't have said it better myself!

Saturday, March 3, 2012

Permission to Pin Revisited

Last week I wrote about my recent concerns regarding Pinterest's terms of agreement. In a nutshell, when we sign up, we are agreeing that own the rights to whatever we pin, and we also give Pinterest full rights to those images. I'm not going to go into detail here; I suggest you read my full blog post if this is news to you.

You are free to interpret these terms however you would like, but I feel that the only respectful thing to do is to ask permission before pinning. I'm not the only one who feels this way, so I'd like to encourage bloggers and site owners to state their permissions clearly in some way. One way is to join the link up described in my original Pinterest blog post, but another way is to simply post a Permission to Pin badge in your sidebar. Feel free to grab this one* and use it, or create your own. If you use this one, I would appreciate a link back to one of my two blog posts on this topic so your visitors will know the whole story, but a link back is not required. I just want to know when I get to a site that it's okay to pin, and I don't want to have to email you to ask. If you would like to use the button shown above, just copy and past this code into an HTML gadget on your sidebar.

<center><a href="http://corkboardconnections.blogspot.com/2012/02/do-you-have-permission-to-pin.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.lauracandler.com/images/pinRed.jpg" border="0" /></a></center>

Over the last week I've seen a number of great blog posts that I wanted to pin, but I couldn't find any statement or information on the site that gave me permission and I moved on. I would be most appreciative if you would join me in spreading the word about this and encouraging others to show visitors that they have permission to pin. Thanks!





*Note: Thanks to Denise Boehm of Sunny Days in Second Grade for her help in designing and creating this Permission to Pin button!

Friday, March 2, 2012

Science Comes Alive with LabTV!

Have you heard of LabTV? It's a free video series from the National Defense Education Program. Each video is just 5 minutes long and briefly covers an interesting topic involving science and math. I discovered this video series several years ago, and my class loved watching each episode! Each video covers a unique or interesting aspect of how science and technology are applied in careers or to solve challenges in everyday life. These shows introduce a few key vocabulary terms and focus on a specific application of a science concept.Topics include space science, robots, health and fitness, learning from dolphins, the technology of science fiction, and so much more!

After I discovered this great resource, I started each day by playing a short LabTV video clip. I created the simple graphic organizer shown on the left to use with the program. The Learning from LabTV graphic organizer has four sections, and each section includes a place for the students to write the episode title and either draw or write about key vocabulary and concepts. Because some of the concepts were challenging, we always discussed each show before I gave them class time to jot down what they had learned.


Using the Learning from LabTV graphic organizer helped my students stay focused on the video and made them aware that they were supposed to be learning something from it. I collected the form at the end of each week and graded it, which reinforced the idea that I expected them to pay attention and think about what they were watching.

If you haven't watched a LabTV show, take a moment to visit the National Defense Education Program site and so so now. But I'm warning you that if you like science, you might be stuck on that page for hours!

Classroom Book Publishing Webinar

Your students can become published authors, and it won't cost you a penny! Studentreasures Publishing has a free program where your class can create a hardcover book with up to 66 pages - 33 stories and 33 color illustrations. You can choose from several book formats that include portrait or landscape pages and lined or unlined paper for the story pages.

I loved using this program in my class, so I'm excited to be able to present a webinar next week about the project called Simple Steps to Classroom Book Publishing. The webinar will take place on March 6th at 8 p.m. EST, but if you miss it, you can watch the recording from the Studentreasures page I've set up on my website. I'm a visual person, so I created the Classbook Storyboard shown below to help teachers plan and organize their projects. I'll be explaining how to use the Storyboard during the webinar. You can download a copy now by clicking on the image.

One reason that I'm so excited about the webinar is that I'll be joined by three other teachers who are just as passionate as I am about the project as I am:

  • Juana Saborido, 6th grade
  • Candy Carl, 1st grade
  • Robin Kramer, 1st grade


The book shown above, An Imaginary World, was created by Juana Saborido's 6th grade class. Juana, Candy, Robin, and I will be available at the end of the session to answer your questions about the Classbook publishing project. The webinar is being hosted by Studentreasures, so a few members of their staff will available to answer questions, too.

You can register for the webinar by clicking on the image on the left to be taken to the Simple Steps to Classroom Book Publishing registration page. You can sign up even if you can't attend the live session and you'll be sent the recording link later.

I know this is a busy time of year, but I hope you'll take time to attend this webinar. Publishing student work for free is an opportunity you don't want to pass up, but the project can be a little tricky the first time you do it. Yes, you can watch the recording later, but you won't be able to have YOUR questions personally answered! Also, at the end of the webinar, 3 participants will be randomly selected to win a $50 gift card to Scholastic, and you do have to be present to win. Please use the social sharing buttons on this blog post to share it with anyone you know who might be interested. I hope you'll join us on Tuesday, March 6th!





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